Burma Superstar Restaurant San Francisco

December 4, 2013 § Leave a comment

tea leaf salad

Burma Superstar is a popular restaurant in San Francisco with multiple locations in the Bay area. My friends took me there for dinner and we ordered the tea leaf salad, a veggie noodle dish, and coconut rice with the okra tofu.

Burmese food is inspired by the various countries that it shares its borders with, that’s India, China, Laos and Thailand. The tea leaf salad was very lightly dressed with lemon juice and oil and had tea leaves that was imported from Burma. It was quite an usual flavour and the nuts and seeds balance the astringent quality of the tea.

burma superstar

The noodles were taught, the way that I like them, and the sauce went quite nicely and the broccoli. The curry was delicious and okra is one of my favourite asian vegetables. The coconut rice was a bit sweet and went nicely with the spiciness of the curry.

white sangriaTheir cocktail menu was impressive and I tried the white sangria that came with a lychee as a garnish. It was a refreshing and light drink which is what I wanted. Burma Superstar does not take reservations so arrive early. Visit their website for more information on their menu, locations and hours. www.burmasuperstar.com.

Saya’s Harusame Salad

September 4, 2013 § Leave a comment

noodles

Harusame is a transparent noodle made from either potato or mung bean starch. It has texture and requires a good chew. This salad is very light and refreshing and easy to pack for lunch.

Ingredients:
harusame noodles
sliced zucchini
sliced yellow pepper
sesame oil
mirin
soya sauce
white rice vinegar
slices of dried chill
sesame seeds

Place the ingredients in a bowl and toss.

Saya’s Watercress and Inari Salad

September 4, 2013 § Leave a comment

watercress and inari salad

A delicious and filling salad that can be eaten as a meal or light snack.

Cooking time 10 minutes

Ingredients:
watercress
sliced warm inari

plum dressing
sesame oil
white rice vinegar
ponzu
2 umeboshi chopped (pickled plum)

Directions:
1. Place the watercress in a bowl and top with sliced inari.
2. Mix the ingredients for the dressing and drizzle on salad.

Fusilli Pasta Salad

September 4, 2013 § Leave a comment

Tokyo, Japan

One my last night in Tokyo, my friend Saya and I cooked a delicious feast while her husband Sunny played bartender. He requested that I make a cold pasta dish, so I made a pasta salad.

I had fun being in the kitchen as I knew it was my last night to enjoy being in Japan with my good friends. It was a fun challenge to create recipes that I am used to using different ingredients and adding a Japanese flare on it.

I used fusilli pasta with fresh vegetables that were available at the market with parmesan in a sweet balsamic dressing. I used the beautiful purple cabbage sprouts as a garnish. Sunny was very happy and thought the dish was beautiful as well as having harmony in the flavours.

Cooking time 30 minutes
Serves 4

Ingredients:
1 package cooked fusilli pasta
1 handful snow peas
1 pint cherry tomatoes cut in half
corn niblets
shavings of parmesan (optional)
1/2 handful green olives
handful of baby greens
finely sliced green onions
chopped fresh basil
purple cabbage sprouts.

Dressing:
olive oil
balsamic vingegar
raw sugar
sliced dried hot pepper
fresh ground pepper

Directions;
1. Place the veggies in a bowl and marinate with the dressing for 1/2 hour.
2. Toss with the pasta, parmesan and 2/3 of fresh basil. Garnish with fresh basil and purple cabbage sprouts.

cold pasta salad

Saya’s Cabbage Salads

September 2, 2013 § 1 Comment

Saya's cabbage salad

Cabbage is the most used vegetable in Japanese cuisine and is in everything. On my first night out, I was with tourists and a friend commented that he was getting sick of cabbage. I actually don’t mind it as in India it’s frequently served as a side salad instead of lettuce which is harder to grow there.

The cabbage salads that Saya served are her own recipes that she has come up. I must say I was quite impressed at how flavourful they were and the one with the sesame oil was my favourite. The traditional Japanese style is to eat cabbage with the sauce that is used for yakisoba. I tried it but I was more impressed with Saya’s personal creations.

Ingredients:
cabbage
white rice vinegar
mirin
sesame oil
thinly sliced hot red pepper

cabbage
kombu seaweed
soy sauce
kombu dashi
salt

cabbage
pink pepper seeds
white rice vinegar
mirin
lemon juice

Directions:
Toss the ingredients in a bowl. I don’t which proportions she used so you’ll have to play around.

Saya Tokyo Japan

Saya’s Arugula Gomae With Sesame Tofu

September 2, 2013 § 1 Comment

Saya's gomae

My Japanese host Saya is very health conscious and serves delicious healthy salads are every meal. Yes, even breakfast which is when she served this one. The food in Japan is very light and even meals with salad and soup for breakfast are lighter than eating toast. This salad is very quick to make  and the sesame tofu is surprisingly from Canada! She was very clever and used a frozen lemon for the zest. The salad tasted very fresh and the tofu melts in your mouth.

Cooking time 5 minutes

Ingredients:
arugula
cherry tomatoes sliced in half
sesame tofu cut into cubes
lemon zest
olive oil
ponzu

Directions:
1. Place arugula in a bowl and top with tomatoes, tofu and zest.
2. Drizzle with olive oil and ponzu

Balsamic Beet Salad

September 20, 2012 § 1 Comment

This beet salad is a go to in my house when I am craving something fresh, healthy, flavourful and filling. It is great on it’s own or accompanied with other fresh vegetables.

Prep time 10 minutes
Serves 1

Ingredients:
2 beets boiled and cut into pieces
1 tsp (5 ml) – 1 tbsp (15 ml) balsamic vinegar
1/4 tsp (1 ml) sea salt
sprinkle freshly ground pepper
1 tbsp (15 ml) chopped cilantro
1 tbsp (15 ml) goat’s cheese (optional)

Mix the ingredients in a bowl and enjoy.

Spicy Cucumber Salad

August 3, 2012 § 1 Comment

When the British colonized India, they decided to scatter Indians throughout the world and my ancestors ended up in Fiji. The tropical climate influenced our food and this salad is a good example of that. On a hot day this salad is a refreshing snack or a great salad to serve with a main when you are in the mood for something light.

Ingredients:
1 cucumber thinly sliced
1 tsp (5 ml) lemon juice
1/3 tsp (2 ml) sea salt
chilli flakes

Method:
Toss the ingredients in bowl and lightly massage the cucumber to allow the flavours to be absorbed.

Pola’s Summer Salad

July 4, 2012 § 2 Comments

To celebrate the beginning of the summer, my friend threw a party and served this amazing summer salad. When I asked her how she made it, she said that she basically threw together some ingredients that were in her fridge. The salad was very fresh and juicy and like a fusion of a greek and fruit salad. It is one of the best salads that I’ve had in a long time and I will be definitely taking this to my next bbq.

watermelon cut into 3/4 – 1 inch pieces
strawberries cut in half
cucumbers cut in quarters lengthwise and into 1 -1 1/4 inch pieces
red pepper cut into long thin strips
cooked quinoa
crumbled feta
sliced almonds
dried cranberries
roughly chopped dill
roughly chopped mint
olive oil
balsamic vinegar

Combine the ingredients in a big bowl, toss and serve.

Mango and Pecan Salad

March 1, 2012 § Leave a comment

Image

The beauty of a salad shines through when you assemble them on an individual serving plate. When you make salads in a big bowl, chances are the smaller bits will sink to the bottom. The visual appeal of food is just as important as taste and can easily enhance the dining experience. When creating your own salads, keep in mind the taste, colour and texture when combing ingredients.

Prep time 10 minutes

Ingredients
3/4 cup (185 ml) chopped spinach
3/4 cup (185 ml) mixed greens
1/2 mango cut into 1/2 inch pieces
2 tbsp (30 ml) goat’s cheese (optional)
1/8 cup (35 ml) pecans
dressing

Arrange the ingredients on a plate in the order listed and toss with your favorite dressing.

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